Several radicalized Canadian citizens are believed to be fighting for the islamic state.

Suspect anyone you know is radicalized and thinking about joining religious extremists overseas? Contact the RCMP before they have the chance to do that.
Remember - two of the most bloodthirsty terrorists involved in the In Amenas hostage crisis in Algeria were from London, Ontario.
If you stop even one of these homegrown terrorists from fighting for IS, you would have saved the lives of several civilians they would have otherwise murdered.
Keep an eye on social media and keep your eyes and ears open in case you see or hear anything suspicious that may be linked with the spread of religious extremism.

Don’t attempt to directly confront anyone you believe may be an extremist as A) they could be dangerous or B) you might be wrong. Contact the authorities and let them handle it if you become suspicious of anybody. Don’t play hero. Play smart.

bag-of-dirt:

A French woman tends to the grave of a 23-year-old Canadian soldier who as buried earlier that day; Bombardier Everitt Ivan Hill of the 2nd Anti-Tank Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, killed during the Battle for Caen. Under his name and date of burial is written ”The French Will Never Forget the Canadians.” Beneath that inscription, on a separate piece of paper, is written in French:

"Rest in peace under the beautiful French sky,
Son of Canada and glorious martyr. 
You have given your life for our deliverance — 
May your name be forever blessed in Heaven.”

Hill, originally from Little Britain, Ontario, enlisted with the Royal Canadian Artillery on 24 March 1941 and landed in Normandy on D-Day. He was later reburied at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near Cintheaux; one of approximately 50,539 Allied casualties in the Battle for Caen. Approximately 226,386 Allied soldiers and between 400,000 to 450,000 Axis soldiers would be killed in the Battle of Normandy. Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. 18 July 1944. Image taken by Canadian Army Lt. Ken Bell.

bag-of-dirt:

A French woman tends to the grave of a 23-year-old Canadian soldier who as buried earlier that day; Bombardier Everitt Ivan Hill of the 2nd Anti-Tank Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, killed during the Battle for Caen. Under his name and date of burial is written ”The French Will Never Forget the Canadians.” Beneath that inscription, on a separate piece of paper, is written in French:

"Rest in peace under the beautiful French sky,

Son of Canada and glorious martyr.

You have given your life for our deliverance —

May your name be forever blessed in Heaven.”

Hill, originally from Little Britain, Ontario, enlisted with the Royal Canadian Artillery on 24 March 1941 and landed in Normandy on D-Day. He was later reburied at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near Cintheaux; one of approximately 50,539 Allied casualties in the Battle for Caen. Approximately 226,386 Allied soldiers and between 400,000 to 450,000 Axis soldiers would be killed in the Battle of Normandy. Caen, Calvados, Lower Normandy, France. 18 July 1944. Image taken by Canadian Army Lt. Ken Bell.



thinksquad:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/miriamberger/canada-just-master-trolled-the-russian-army-on-twitter#2z0jiuj

1938.
Nazi troops flood over the Austrian border with tanks and artillery. Nazi sleeper cells and sympathizers arm themselves and begin patrolling the streets, crushing any attempt at resistance.
A “referendum” is forced on the country - stay independent, or allow itself to be annexed by the foreign power that now has every citizen and every cultural landmark held at gunpoint.
Sound familiar?
Because that’s exactly what happened in Crimea. The takeover of Crimea by Russia was achieved through extortion and illegal military occupation.
Just because a territory was historically under the rule of your predecessor doesn’t mean it’s your right to invade a neutral country and retake that territory. By that logic, Russia may as well belong to Mongolia because it was once conquered by the Golden Horde.


I think we need to focus on us. I don't think that means we don't necessarily get involved, but I think we've lost a lot of respect internationally for following the American's lead too much. I think the Powers that Be have lost sight of the distinction between "supporting your allies" and "doing the same thing as everyone else" and that lack of essence of what it means to be Canadian is at the core of our armed forces but the vast majority of people don't see it that way.
Anonymous

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As a Millennial I feel like Afghanistan was a surprise I just kind of 'found out' about mid-way through watching America's Iraq war. It never felt like we really belonged in the region because I had no idea why we went beyond "Al Queda Is Bad" and the media never focused on it? I come from a politically-savvy household, and it was just like a non-entity. But Russia is actually physically invading Ukraine. There are pictures. There are weapons. There is common sense saying it's happening 1/2

|
V


2/2 I don't want war. In my heart I don't want war. But I don't have much faith in Canada's Peace Keeping efforts or our power and position on the world stage. I hate the idea that NORAD is now a completely valid program protecting the north. I hate the fact that IF it comes to direct military conflict, there will always be the threat of a northern front in Canada. I don't think it would in fact happen, but the threat is there, the possibility is real. It upsets me, but I just don't know.

I too only learned about Afghanistan a few years after we actually first deployed there. I first became aware when I was in the sixth grade and Operation Medusa was unfolding on our television sets. I thought little of the faces of fallen Canadian troops they showed on screen. It took a few more years before I understood the tremendous impact of every Canadian casualty sustained there.
I remember very clearly when I found out about 9/11. I don’t remember if it was that exact day or sometime after but I vividly remember playing with Legos in my living room and seeing images of planes flying into buildings on CNN. I asked my dad what was going on and when he explained what happened it shocked me to my core. At my school we had a moment of silence for the first couple years after that on September 11 at the time the north tower collapsed.
I thought in Iraq we were going after the perpetrators of 9/11. It was all over the news and that’s what I thought was happening there. When I first heard of Afghanistan there were very few of the transfixing images they showed in the invasion of Iraq. No nighttime videos of the Baghdad skyline with tracers and rockets flying every which way, no images of burning buildings and large scale bombardments.
Just a handful of Canadians in their LAVs in some shithole desert taking fire from invisible douchebags with Kalashnikovs. I only understood much later that the people who launched the attacks were based on Afghanistan, not Iraq.

As time went on, my fascination with war and politics grew and so did my understanding of why we always get involved.
In 1914 we were dragged into the Great War because a neutral country was invaded by Germany for refusing to allow German troops to march through their territory.
In 1939 we debated for a week and declared war against a genocidal imperialist regime that had already annexed two neutral countries and was actively invading a third.
In the Cold War we gained a reputation as peacekeepers and were very successful in the role until a few rotten eggs in the Airborne Regiment and the UN’s apathy in Rwanda ruined the world’s faith in peacekeeping.
In 2001, when thousands of civilians from all over the world (including Canada) lay dead under the rubble of the pentagon and the twin towers, victims of an extreme religious ideology, we dove head first into our longest war, eventually deploying troops to the enemy’s home turf in Kandahar where Bush himself refused to deploy American troops in force due to the risk. All this happened while our troops had to deal with government inefficiency and ignorance along with the rise of a pseudo-intellectual neo-hippie movement back home.

There will always be nations and groups out there who think they can bully others, who think they have a claim to their neighbours and to the world. There will always be nations and groups out there who want to destroy our way of life. And so long as they exist we will need the Canadian Armed Forces. Ours has always been an army of volunteers, who’ve always fought the enemy over there so we don’t have to face them on our territory.

We don’t want war. We don’t want troops marching through our streets.
Russia wants to carve out a new empire for itself in Eastern Europe. What will be next if we let them do that? Will they conquer Poland and Germany and the rest of our allies in Europe? Will they succeed in a second invasion of Finland? What of our northern territories, what’s to say the Russians won’t have the balls to annex those once they’ve tasted blood in Europe?
Just today, Putin reminded us that Russia has nuclear armament, trying to evoke the danger of nuclear annihilation.

He’s a madman, the same brand of unabated callous aggressor we saw in the world wars, in the peace missions, in Rwanda, and in Afghanistan.
We can’t let him subjugate the Ukrainian people. The last time the Russians held a grip on the Ukraine, millions died from famine and a huge region of the Ukrainian countryside was rendered uninhabitable by Russia’s nuclear experiments and remains uninhabitable. Our country has the free world’s largest expatriate Ukrainian community. They’ve given us some of our best - artists, astronauts, musicians, scientists, athletes, doctors. Just yesterday I received treatment from a Ukrainian-Canadian nurse.
We can’t just sit on our asses while we allow one of our most important communities to lose their homeland to turmoil and aggression. It’s never been in Canada’s nature to sit back while aggressors attempt to impose themselves by force on their neighbours.
Putin already has the blood of thousands of Ukrainians on his hands and there is not a doubt in my mind that he wants to add a few other countries to his tally.
Russia wants the Ukraine and I honestly feel that, if we value our way of life, if we value our freedom and our existence, we need to deny them every opportunity to set a precedent.

We’ve lost and sacrificed too much over the past century to let Russia have it’s way with the world. Over a hundred thousand Canadians have laid down their lives and hundreds of thousands more drew blood and spilled their own, and we are now facing the biggest threat we’ve seen since the Nazis. We can’t allow the Russians to steamroll through Europe. We can’t allow them to gain a foothold that would eventually allow them to threaten Canada herself.

-André


What do you all think about the potential for a military conflict with Russia?

Should we go in guns blazing of just never ever get involved?
After Afghanistan do we have the capacity or the will to fight another war?
What do you all think?



Under the Heavenly Sky… by Adrian Lang

Under the Heavenly Sky… by Adrian Lang



GWIC Takes Five

thelandofmaps:

Map Posted on Twitter by Canada’s NATO Delegation with the caption “Geography can be tough. Here’s a guide for Russian soldiers who keep getting lost & ‘accidentally’ entering #Ukraine” [794x625]CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

thelandofmaps:

Map Posted on Twitter by Canada’s NATO Delegation with the caption “Geography can be tough. Here’s a guide for Russian soldiers who keep getting lost & ‘accidentally’ entering #Ukraine” [794x625]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com



militaryarmament:

A Paratrooper with the 173rd Airborne Brigade sits next to a Canadian soldier from Mike Company, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment as he fires a US Mk 19 Grenade Launcher during joint range during Operation #REASSURANCE on July 17, 2014 in Eastern Europe.

militaryarmament:

A Paratrooper with the 173rd Airborne Brigade sits next to a Canadian soldier from Mike Company, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment as he fires a US Mk 19 Grenade Launcher during joint range during Operation #REASSURANCE on July 17, 2014 in Eastern Europe.



In the centre of the divisional front [the Canadians] attacked at about 1530 hrs with one reinforced battalion supported by 16 tanks in the direction of point 100 and succeeded in advancing to this point.
German report on the fighting near Ortona on December 26, 1943 between elements of the 1st Fallschirmjager division and the shattered remnant of the 48th Highlanders who were later supported by 3 tanks.

militaryarmament:

Joint tactical air controllers from the 148th Air Support Operations Squadron and Royal Canadian Forces conducting a joint exercise during Operation Northern Strike 2014 near Rogers City, Mich., on Aug. 6, 2014.


fnhfal:

War in Afghanistan 

Canadians on Kandahar Province, specifically. I believe this picture was taken either in 2009 or 2011.

fnhfal:

War in Afghanistan 

Canadians on Kandahar Province, specifically. I believe this picture was taken either in 2009 or 2011.